This section provides basic information about this web site. You can also find additional information in the FAQ section.


About Pixelboy
About this site
How to read the e-Card Catalog
Guidelines and policies regarding e-mail
Closing words





About Pixelboy

Luc Miron was the original creator and maintainer of the e-Reader Zone. An active member of the internet community since 1996, most people know him as Pixelboy, which is a self-given nickname. He's a computer programmer, although he has no ties with the video game industry.


About this site

This web site was opened on October 7th 2002, and was later closed on Febuary 14th 2004. Pixelboy created it to fill a certain void about the e-Reader coverage on the web. While not a true trading card collector, he felt a certain degree of excitement regarding e-Cards, because he believed this medium had a lot of potential. The e-Reader immediately made a good impression on him, and he honestly thought Nintendo would make a lot of money with it, if they played their cards right (which they didn't, as history demonstrated).

The main reason why Pixelboy created this web site is the e-Card Catalog section. The goal was to provide a reference guide for serious e-Card collectors. With this catalog, and all the other sections of this web site, Pixelboy wanted to do what he could to promote the e-Reader, with the hope that this medium would achieve its full potential. What exactly was this potential? That's the main topic he discussed in the section titled Pixelboy's Diary.


How to read the e-Card Catalog

To be listed in the e-Card Catalog, a card must have at least one data strip along one of its edges, and this data strip must be compatible with the e-Reader (This is why, for example, you will not find all 165 cards of the Pokémon Expedition series of e-Cards, because not all of them have data strips).

Each entry in the catalog contains these data items:

PN: This is an unofficial numbering system Pixelboy devised to uniquely identify each and every e-Card. He felt the need to implement this numbering system because not all e-Cards have serial numbers printed on them, and because e-Cards may come from a variety of different sources. (What does "PN" stand for, you ask? "Pixelboy Number". Yeah, it's corny, but at least the acronym sounds okay. ;-) )
Serial Number: The identification code printed somewhere on the card.
Name: The main designation of the e-Card, together with a numeric identifier if the card is part of a consecutive sub-series.
Category: Specifies the group to which the e-Card belongs. e-Cards are usually part of larger series, such as "NES-e", "Pokémon Expedition", "Game & Watch", etc.
Maker: Indicates the name of the company responsible for the development of the data encoded on the e-Card data strips.
Distributor: Indicates the name of the company responsible for the production, marketing and general distribution of the e-Card.
Release Date: The date at which the e-Card became available to the public, either through retail outlets, or via promotional events.
Rarity Level: Rates the difficulty involved in finding the card. Most e-Cards are either "Common" or "Uncommon", meaning they can be found rather easely. Some cards are labelled "Rare" or "Very Rare", and as the label implies, they are harder to find. Please take note that the rarity ratings for the Animal Crossing-e series might be slightly inaccurate.
Availability: Indicates the available ways you can acquire the e-Card.
Data Strips: Describes how many data strips there are on the e-Card, and comments on the contents of these data strips, mostly in terms of their relation to other cards. If the card is meant to be used with a Nintendo Game Cube game, it will be mentionned here.
Notes: Additional miscellaneous comments about the e-Card, historical facts, etc.
Do I have it: Specifies if Pixelboy has an exemplary of the card in his personal collection. This might be useful to certain visitors of this site.



Guidelines and policies regarding e-mail

Please note that this web site is NOT maintained by Pixelboy, but by Damien Good, with Pixelboy's blessing. If you have any questions or comments about this site, please direct your e-mail to
[email protected].


Closing words

Neither Pixelboy nor I (Damien Good) claim any copyright on any material displayed on this site. Feel free to download anything you want, including the pictures in the e-Card Catalog.

This site is totally independent. It is not endorsed, supported, affiliated, or otherwise autorized by Nintendo, or any other company.